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Uber Careers

Uber Career Information

Looking to begin a career at Uber Technologies Inc?

Below, you’ll find a current listing for all current Uber Career openings in 2019, as well as information on the Uber Interview process, as well as applicant requirements.

Click on the links below to see actual job offerings currently available at Uber in 2019:

Uber Job Openings 2019

Uber Advanced Technology Jobs 

Uber Business Jobs 

Uber Communications Jobs

Uber Design Jobs

Uber Engineering Jobs

Uber Finance and Accounting Jobs

Uber Global Community Operations Jobs

Uber Growth Marketing Jobs

Uber Legal Jobs

Uber Local Marketing Jobs

Uber Operations and Launch Jobs

Uber People and Places Jobs

Uber Public Policy Jobs 

Uber Safety and Security Jobs

Uber Job Requirements & Availability

There are many Uber Career openings in the corporate sector all across the world.

Uber exists in over 500 cities around the world — and the company is always recruiting top talent. When seeking a job at Uber, be prepared for a series of interviews and tests (which differ, depending on the position you seek).

Check out our guide to Uber careers below. We look into specific requirements for starting a career at Uber Technologies, and review the general job applicant prerequisites for a jobs at Uber.

Uber Interview Questions

When applying for an Uber Career, applicants will be faced with a series of interview questions, which often build off of ‘real world scenarios’ and challenge an applicant’s critical thinking skills.

There are two main Uber Career types:

  • Jobs which require a data & analytics background (i.e., Driver Operations)
  • Jobs which require a creative or marketing background (Community Managers, Marketing Creatives, etc). Some jobs (such as a general manager) combine creative & data requirements into a single job (so you’ll have to pass tests which assess both ability types).

Here are examples of two interview ‘paths’ you can expect, if you’re applying for a job at Uber (in this case, we review the paths of an Operations Manager and a Marketing Manager:

Uber Career Steps (General Manager & Operations Managers):

  1. Phone interview, or Skype Interview, with an Uber Representative
  2. If you’re seeking an Uber general manager position (or related position), applicants will be asked to take a 32-question multiple choice test.
  3. Uber will send applicants the test, which is contained in a downloadable CSV file format. The test is strictly timed (there is a 2-hour limit). Expect to answer analytics questions (such as basic data equations, as well as being expected to write a few mini-essays, often on the subject of communicating with drivers in a dynamic and encouraging way). Uber is testing applicants to see whether they can interpret data, as well as manage personnel effectively.
  4. If you pass the test, you will be asked to complete an additional phone interview (sometimes 2-3 phone interviews).
  5. After you’ve successfully completed the phone interview process, you will be invited to a local Uber Headquarters and be interviewed in a group setting.
  6. A ‘chief interviewer’ will field a series of questions to the group, and applicants will be expected to jump in & give their best answers to open-ended questions like ‘’How would you preserve Uber’s market share (and retain riders) in a city which is threatened by a new rideshare competitor with large amounts of investment capital?’’
  7. Applicants will have to ‘think on the fly’ and answer these questions as effectively as possible. It helps to be aggressive, confident, and do basic calculations and logical reasoning as fast as you can — while showing a sufficient general knowledge background about Uber’s business model & implementation goals.
  8. An Uber Representative will assess your performance in the ‘group’ session, but you wont know the results of your performance until later. Before you leave Uber HQ, you’ll be asked to create a powerpoint presentation on a subject of your choice — you’ll be expected to make it dynamic, interesting and engaging. The catch is – you’ll be expected to create this presentation in less than 24 hours.
  9. Depending on your success in the group sessions and the powerpoint presentation, you will be either offered a job with Uber, or told you’ve been passed over & given suggestions on re-applying.

Uber Career Steps (Marketing Manager):

  1. 1-3 Phone interviews (or Skype Interviews) with an Uber Representative in the marketing department
  2. Marketing managers are not expected to undergo the data & analytics tests which are given to programmers; operations managers and general managers. Instead, they will be given a ‘creative test’ which evaluates their creative reasoning on a holistic basis.
  3. Uber will send applicants the Creative Test, which can be completed within a three-week period (*submission times vary across the globe, but there is usually no strict submission deadline, like you would expect in a normal exam).
  4. Applicants will have to answer four different sections, which will require approximately 10-12 pages of written content. This content involves brand generation, twitter knowledge, marketing idea creation, blog posts writing, customer relations & communications, and a variety of other marketing processes.

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Uber Marketing Job (Sample Test):

If you’re interested in taking a look at an Uber Interview Test, check out an actual test from 2015 which was issued to applicants looking for an Uber Career as a Marketing Creative:

Section 1: Marketing

A) Promotions: Uber has a long track record of engaging people in unique and interesting ways. We want to create promotions that not only acquire new users at a high ROI, but present exciting and surprising ways for potential riders to interact with Uber.

Write a project plan to present to your manager for the below 2 categories. For each project  plan, include:

  • What are your goals? What are you looking to accomplish?
  • What is your audience for this promotion?
  • A comprehensive outline of how a potential rider would interact with your promotion
  • How you will you message this promotion? Social media? Email? Third party?
  • What will be messaged to the public? Write a paragraph or two of copy that explains the promotion and engages your audience
  • What possible pitfalls do you see in organizing this promotion? How you will get around those pitfalls?
  • How will you measure the efficacy of these promotions?

Category 1: A promotion focused on acquiring users for our low-cost option, uberX

Category 2: An on-demand promotion similar to Uber Ice Cream our Uber Chopper.

B) Laundry List: Create a laundry list of marketing ideas, whether an event/promo/etc. Include a 1-2 sentence description for each, topped off with a creative & catchy blog post title for that idea.

C) Practical: Find a bar or restaurant in your city that you believe would make a good partner for Uber. Talk with the owners and managers of that bar. How would they want to partner with Uber? What do they want in return? How would you structure this partnership to be most beneficial for Uber?

Section 2: Support

Keeping disgruntled customers happy is a huge part of the job. Let’s see how you’d handle some of the worst customer emails we’ve seen, those listed below. You can take some liberties with refunds or whatever you see fit. At Uber we use a casual/fun but professional tone … let’s see what you got!

  1. Driver turned a two mile trip into an 8 mile trip. No way I’m paying this. Expect a chargeback and some posts through my social media channels.
  2. Hey Uber, I had a really strange interaction with my driver yesterday. First, he was a bit terse and distracted when trying to figure out my pickup location. Then, when I finally got in the car, he got into an accident. I know these things happen. But the reason he got into an accident was that he was insisting on passing a water bottle to me in the backseat. I didn’t even ask for one.The worst part was that he wouldn’t let me out of the car after the accident. The child locks were on. I asked to be let out but he said “No. It will only take a minute.” I asked one more time to open the doors, but again he said that he would be done in a minute. I felt uncomfortable at this point, so did not ask again. Could you explain how this behavior could come from one of your employees?
  3. Uber made my engagement last night! I was proposing to my longtime girlfriend, and I knew I needed that special touch. I ordered an UberBLACK for the occasion. I could not have asked for a better driver. He really made the event feel special. Thanks Uber!

 Section 3: Analytics

The following is for us to see how you think about promos and metrics. Answer as best you can. We want to just see your thought process here (even if youʼre not sure).

A charity event has come to you and said they have a 1,000 person event and are willing to do a dedicated email to their attendees. Youʼve done events like this in the past and have the following historical data:

[Note: You do not need all of the info for each of the questions

Promo (new user) – Promo Value; “dollars off a trip” Conversion – “Percent of users redeeming promo” Avg Trip – “Average Uber trip fare ($)”

People – Event Attendees

# rides/year – “Number of assumed Uber rides per year per client” Margin – “Uber’s portion of the fare”

Questions:

  1. Which promo should we use and why?
  2. If we want to return a profit on each rider within 6 months, what is the max amount that we would give on a promo?
  3. How would you think about increasing conversion? [“promo conversion”?

*Unrelated to the above table and questions:

  1. Youʼve noticed that average trips/signup has gone down
  2. What could be causing this?
  3. How might you increase it?

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